Reviews

The Man from Nowhere by Saurav Dutt: A Thought-provoking Read on Racial Abuse

From the last few novels, it becomes clear that Saurav Dutt writes wonderful stories on the scaffold of discrimination against race, religion, caste, creed, and colour. The Man from Nowhere is based on similar lines where a man has gone recluse and lives in a good house with less or zero touch from the outside people that live in his society. He is rich but ironical not happy the way things turned up for him. The pain point is that his wife seeking divorce from him. She is greedy. Besides, the man is way clumsy and indulged into self things that look odd and suspicious to others. But he is clean. He cannot be blamed for his clumsy nature or reclusive habits. Anyway society thinks in other way.

In a clear way it can be concluded that money is not the ultimate ballast that can alter all status and bring peace into life. The man fulfilled his wealth status way back. But the underlying message in the book is that when the society targets you or discriminates you against colour, caste, and religion, all these aspects look puny. In the novel racial abuse, racial discrimination, blaming others on the basis of religion and colour is evident right since the start. Characters like Ben and Spike are after that man when the bomb blasts occur in some downtown. Probably, the Americans take fun in blaming poor or inferior looking ethnics like Asians or Negros or Arabs for terror and other disturbing elements, especially after 9/11.

The man had it all, more than the limit. So one day, he shoots himself in the brain but he did not die. That is another agony for him. The story then goes backward and tells the account of last 5 days…aftermath the bomb blasts. Despite living in a posh and secular looking society the man is targeted as one of the suspects for bombing. The character is perfect for that – he is a Muslim, brown, and weird in many ways. His neighbors like Conrad and Ben abuse him for no substantial reason. While the police cop Spike is hell bent to charge him for the bombings.

The tone of the novel is sarcastic and funny. But still it is not an easy read…maybe in second time story comes handy. However, the author effortlessly preached very serious issues of blaming others in the guise of racial abuse and identity crises. All the characters are apt to the situations. The lead guy is extremely clumsy and funny. He is innocent and adorable. His only mistake was that he always thought that he was made for the Western culture, he ignored his roots and lineage and that caused trauma in his life.

Mr. Dutt’s take on racial abuse and its allied arteries is superb and to the point. The following excerpt proves it efficiently.

“He could be an illegal, one of those undocumented types,” Flower offered “he kind a looks too, I don’t know, weak to be a terrorist.”

It is a different novel. Saurav picks up the other-wisely ignored aspects for his stories. If you have read him previously, you may agree with it. Be it anything, Saurav Dutt is a brilliant and terrific writer with prose-like yet sharp narration skills.

The cover page is black and dark that depicts the mental crises of the man it has. Often Saurav Dutt’s novels are laced with social messages or say based on humanitarian compassion. They appeal for harmony and love and peace. Talking about characters, all are funny and strange with their peculiar characteristics. One will not get bored by them. The protagonist is the man that suffers. The novel is slightly monotonous due to lack of characters and long timeline, yet it makes up for a good read, owing to Saurav’s brilliant writing skills.

TitleThe Man from Nowhere
ASINB092DQSNXX
Edition Reviewed2021
AuthorSaurav Dutt
The Asian Review Rating 8 out of 10

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